Inside a French castle used on the set of Netflix’s ‘Lupin’


This European palace was once among the world’s most grand — but today is a marvel of decay. 

Netherlands-based photographer Roman Robroek, 34, has shared photos of his recent visit to France’s Crèvecœur-en-Brie castle, which has fallen far from its former splendor. But despite its downtrodden appearance, fans of the popular French Netflix series “Lupin” — based on the Maurice Leblanc book — will recognize it, as the crew used it as a shoot location for certain scenes.

Located in France’s Seine-et-Marne province, the sprawling structure dates back to the middle ages. Constructed in the 10th century, it was initially used as a fort. In 1095, it was then utilized by the first crusaders at the same time as its Lord went off to fight. According to local legend, the Lord’s wife cheated on him with the castle steward when he was away, Jam Press reported. He found out about the betrayal upon returning, and had her executed by being dragged to death by an untamed horse. 

abandoned castle france Seine-et-Marne
The Netflix show “Lupin” used the space as a set.
Jam Press/Roman Robroek
abandoned castle france Seine-et-Marne
The castle has fallen badly into disrepair.
Jam Press/Roman Robroek
abandoned castle france Seine-et-Marne
Detritus covers an entire stair landing.
Jam Press/Roman Robroek
abandoned castle france Seine-et-Marne
Wallpaper peels cinematically from the walls.
Jam Press/Roman Robroek
abandoned castle france Seine-et-Marne
Another striking shot of the abandoned property.
Jam Press/Roman Robroek
abandoned castle france Seine-et-Marne
An old bed adds to the haunted feeling.
Jam Press/Roman Robroek

Over the subsequent centuries, the castle expanded extensively — and by 1662, it boasted a courtyard, a garden, a chapel, halls and various side buildings.

Modern history has been less kind to both castle and kingdom. By the 1990s, the castle was empty and the local village had only 200 residents. It has since fallen into movie-worthy disrepair, with dirt and rubble covering its staircases, wallpaper peeling from walls and a general sense of neglect permeating every square inch.

Although hauntingly beautiful in its deterioration, the castle’s story is not unique in the nation.

“Today, there are an estimated 45,000 castles in France alone and only 11,000 of them are meticulously classified and held in high regard as historical landmarks,” said Robroek, who has been photographing abandoned buildings for more than a decade. “Thankfully, shows like ‘Lupin,’ as well as modern tourism trends, are bringing more attention to these buildings, with new opportunities for these once-forgotten places to experience a new life.”



Source link