Storm King Art Center is officially getting a major revamp


Storm King Art Center, the beloved open-air museum a mere 90-minute drive from midtown Manhattan, is getting a major revamp courtesy of a $45 million capital project set to break ground later this year and will be completed by 2024 (by New York standards, that’s pretty quick!). 

Storm King Art Center
Photograph: Courtesy of Storm King Art Center

Among the plenty of updates that visitors will delight in are a new outdoor lobby; the construction of a “conversation, fabrication and maintenance building,” according to an official press release; a slew of accessible amenities; consolidated parking and “a holistic approach to landscape stewardship and environmental sustainability.” 

As New Yorkers very well know, Storm King is impressive as it is: the 500-acre nonprofit destination opened by in 1960 and has garnered both in-state and out-of-state fans ever since. Some of the most renowned artists of the 20th century have been displaying their work there for years and the museum now boasts a collection of outdoor sculptures that claims to be the largest of its kind in the U.S.

An ideal weekend destination in warmer months, Storm King is a truly unique project and the recently announced infusion of capital meant to better the museum further is a testament to the city’s devotion to all things culture and art.

Storm King Art Center
Photograph: Courtesy of Storm King Art Center

According to The Architect’s Newspaper, “the $44.5 million capital campaign first kicked off in 2017 with $43.5 million being raised to date.” The state itself added $2.6 million to that budget. Today, the venue also launched a public fundraising effort “to help take the campaign over the finish line.” You can donate to the effort right here.

Storm King has enlisted the help of a roster of global consultants to maximize its renovation efforts. 

“It was important for us to approach elements as different types of spaces rather than ‘buildings’—visitors come to Storm King to be outdoors,” said Róisín Heneghan, Cofounder of heneghan peng architects, a project partner on the effort, in an official statement. “We interrogated the indoor/outdoor duality as much as possible, continually questioning how much of the design could be part of nature. The team spent a lot of time walking through the site, considering how visitors arrive at elements in the landscape. This led us to create spaces whose placements are so integrated that they feel intuitive.”



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